Ethical Principles

Ethical Principles

In actuality, the development of researches and experiments is, to a significant extent, defined by ethical principles which play a very important role in the contemporary medicine and researches. The basic ethical principles were defined by Belmont Report and these principles are often viewed as guidelines for the conducting of ethically plausible scientific researches and experiments, especially in the field of medicine. At the same time, it is very important to understand the essence of these principles in order to follow them respectively to their original sense and in order to minimize the possibility of the violation of ethical norms and principles, which is absolutely unacceptable in the healthcare system.
First of all, it should be said that one of the primary concerns of researches and healthcare professionals was and still is the respect for persons which are involved in experiments, researches or treatments. What is meant here is the fact that researchers should respect autonomy of the subjects and take into consideration their position in relation to experiments. In other words, researchers cannot impose their will on the subject or force them to get involved into the experiment or research (Mossman, 1997). Instead, researchers have to receive a conscious consent of the subject and, what is more, it is very important that relatives of the subject were also informed about the research and experiment and they should not oppose to the involvement of the subject into the experiment. Otherwise, the research or experiment will be arguable from the ethical point of view since without consent of the subject, researchers have no moral or ethical right to conduct a research or experiment.
Furthermore, researchers should take into consideration all possible risks the subject of the research or experiment can face in the process of the realization of the project of the research. Naturally, it may be difficult to identify the major threats to the subject of the research if some innovative technology or medicament is involved, but still the research should conduct the experiment with a minimal risk to the health and life of the patient (Dickman, 2000). In actuality, there should be a little room for doubt of the research because if the researcher is not sure in the safety of the outcomes of the experiment for the health of the subject, he or she should delay the realization of the experiment until creating safer conditions for its practical implementation.
Finally, researches should be just. What is meant here is the fact that researchers should not view the subject as a material they can use in abundance in their experiments. This principle is particularly important in relation to experiments involving humans. In such a situation, researchers must be absolutely sure that there are no alternatives to the experiment involving humans (Scalise, 2002). Otherwise, the experiment would be ethically unjust and not motivated by just reasons.
Thus, in conclusion, it should be said that basic ethical principles focus the attention of researches on respect for persons, involved in experiments, beneficence of experiments, and justice of experiments.

References:
Dickman, R. L. (2000, March). Bending the rules to get a medication. American Family Physician 61 (5), 1563.
Mossman, K. L. (1997). Medical testing: Issues and ethics. Forum for Applied Research and Public Policy 12 (3), 90.
Scalise, D. (2002) CPOE: Is it worth it? Hospitals & Health Networks, 76(1).
Shane, R. (2002) Computerized physician order entry: Challenges and opportunities. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, 59(3), 286-288
Taylor, R. et al. (2002) Quantifying value for physician order-entry systems: A balance of cost and quality. Healthcare Financial Management, (7), 44-48.