Organizing and Staffing

Organizing and Staffing

Basically, an effective functioning of an organization depends on the relationship between managers and employees and the ability of managers to delegate their authority and responsibility to employees. In actuality, many organizations tend to the provision of their employees with a high degree of autonomy in order to increase the efficiency of their performance and the performance of the organization at large. In this respect, the delegation and empowerment become key concepts that often define the effectiveness of the work of employees and the performance of organizations, especially in healthcare setting where the autonomy of employees and ability to take independent decisions with a high degree of responsibility is particularly significant.
In fact, the delegation implies the downward transfer of formal authority from a supervisor to a subordinate (Allen, 2002). Today, this function is very important because the growing complexity of organization structure and the changing role of human resources lead to the growing role of the delegation. To put it more precisely, the delegation gives employee autonomy which increases the effectiveness of the performance of organization because it give an employee with an opportunity to act in accordance with and react on the changing environment and situation within the organization. In such a way, an employee works more effectively because he or she is able to undertake actions that are needed right at the moment. As a result, the organization’s functioning becomes more flexible and it can adapt to the changing environment more effectively. Otherwise, the lack of the delegation would lead to bureaucratization of organizations. The delegation is particularly important in healthcare setting where employees should take decisions fast since often time spent on taking decisions can save the life of patients (Fuchs and Emanuel, 2005).
At the same time, the delegation contributes to the empowerment of employees. Due to the delegation, employees feel more confident in their own power and responsibility and, hence, their importance in the organization. In addition, the empowerment of employees increase the effectiveness of the organization’s performance since managers, through the delegation and empowerment of employees, free themselves to manage more effectively (Allen, 2002). Employees can perform functions that are originally supposed to be delegated to managers solely, but through the delegation and empowering employees, managers share their functions with employees and, thus, they can focus on other aspects of managing the organization (Pinkerton, 2000). The latter opens larger opportunities for the effective implementation of knowledge and professionals skills of managers on the upper level of the management, where the qualification and professional level of employees are insufficient and where managers can be particularly useful for the organization.
However, managers, while delegating and empowering employees, should be careful of the professional level and the responsibility of their employees. Managers should delegate their functions and empower employees only when they are confident in their employees and their ability to perform the functions effectively.
Thus, it is possible to conclude that the delegation and empowering are effective tools that can facilitate the functioning of organizations and increase their performance. On the other hand, it is important to insure the ability of employees to perform delegated functions.

References:
Allen, G. (1998,2002). Delegating. Retrieved on May 17, 2008 from <http://ollie.dcccd.edu/mgmt1374/book_contents/3organizing/deleg/delegate.htm>
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Coddington, D. C., Fischer, E. A., & Moore, K. D. (2000). “Characteristics of successful health care systems.” Health Forum Journal. San Francisco: Nov/Dec 2000. Vol. 43, Iss. 6.
Fuchs, V. R. and Emanuel, E. J. (2005). “Health Care reform: Why? What? When?” Health Affairs, 24 (6), 1399.
Pinkerton, S. (2000). “Integrated delivery systems: What's happening?” Nursing Economics. Pitman: Jul/Aug 2000. Vol. 18, Iss. 4.
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