Reproductive Rights

Reproductive Rights

Traditionally, reproductive rights are associated with serious complications since it is often very difficult to clearly distinguish reproductive rights, especially when the question of the survival of a fetus and the future of a newborn is under a question. In this respect, the case of John and Jane involving Gina as surrogate mother and Thomas and Diane, as donors of sperm and eggs, and the yet-unborn child is particularly complicated since the genetic disorder requiring gender reclassification after the birth provoked contradictions in views of John and Jane, on the one hand, and Gina, on the other.
Basically, the decision concerning the gender reclassification should take into consideration interests of parents and a child. In this respect, it seems to be quite difficult to define whether it is John and Jane, who actually wanted to have a child that should decide, or, probably, it is Gina, a surrogate mother that should take the final decision. Taking into consideration the fact that John and Jane are unwilling to have a child who needs a gender reclassification and attempt to convince Gina to abortion, it is likely that it is up to Gina to take the final decision. In fact, the reason is obvious since it is her health and the health of the child she bears that are at stakes. For instance, the abortion is obviously a threat to her health, while John and Jane apparently cannot take adequate decision since they do not want this child at all. Hence Gina should decide what will happen to the child. On the other hand, the interests of the child should be also taken into consideration. Even though from an ethical point of view it would be logical to wait till the puberty of a child and make him or her to decide on the gender reclassification, it would be more logical to let Gina decide because the postponing of the gender classification can provoke serious psychological problems and may affect the process of the socialization of the child since he or she will feel being different from other children (Chervenak and McCullough, 2003). As a result, the best solution of this dilemma would be the decision taken by Gina on the gender reclassification.
The problem discussed in this case proves the fact that age should be the factor that permits pregnancy and parenthood via A.R.T. Obviously, age of a mother is apparently a risk factor for a child (Duin, 1999). In spite of the progress of the modern medicine, the older the mother is the higher is the risk of health problems of a child. Consequently, without regulation of the age that permits pregnancy and parenthood, the health of a child is unnecessarily put under a serious threat. Hence, the regulation of the age factors is necessary.
Thus, taking into account all above mentioned, it is possible to conclude that the case discussed above reveals the fact that decisions on the future of a child should be taken not only by those people who are willing to have a child but also by biological parents, namely surrogate mother and the age of parents should be regulated in order to avoid risks to the child’s health.

References:
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Duin, J. (1999, July). Reckless reproduction? Insight on the News 15 (26), 41.
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