Waiting for Godot

Waiting for Godot

Table of contents:
1. Introduction
2. Godot as a symbol of deity
3. Religious implications of Vladimir and Estragon
4. Symbolical significance of Pozzo and Lucky
5. Conclusion
6. References


Introduction
“Waiting for Godot” by Samuel Beckett is a very controversial play and critics still argue what actually the figure of Godot means since the main characters of the play are waiting for him, but he never comes. Among the variety of interpretations, it is possible to single out the religious implications of the play at large and Godot in particular. The author makes several references to Jesus and religion throughout the play that may an indication to the religious meaning or context of Godot and the entire play. At the same time, the main characters and their actions can be interpreted in different ways and, on a profound analysis, the religious theme seems to be quite strongly presented in the play. This is why it is possible to estimate that Godot may be a symbol of God or, at least, a kind of Messiah for whom people are waiting, while the characters are people who are confused while waiting for Godot, whom they are hardly able to recognize.
Godot as a symbol of deity
In spite of the absence of Godot as a real, living character in the play, his presence is always felt throughout the play. Even though, no one can say for sure what Godot looks like, what he is and what the main characters are waiting him for, they still wait and expect the appearance of Godot. On analyzing the play regardless of names, but purely on the level of symbols and implications, it becomes obvious that Godot is a symbol of God or a new Messiah whom religious people, namely true Christians, are waiting for in the hope for salvation. In this respect, it should be said that the appearance of Godot is unclear to the main characters, Estragon and Victor. Nevertheless, they have a vague idea of how he looks like. At first, they believe Pozzo is Godot because he wears a long white bears and such a description makes him similar to the traditional description of God or some saints which are typical for Christian tradition.
Furthermore, the main characters do not know precisely what they are waiting Godot for, but they believe that his appearance will change their life somehow for better. At any rate, when Estragon and Victor expect that Godot is about to appear, they repeatedly cry “We are saved!” (Beckett, 2006). Obviously, it is a direct indication to the fact that Godot is supposed to bring the salvation to the main characters. In this respect, it should be said that in the Christian tradition, it is Jesus who is supposed to return to save people on the day of Apocalypses. Anyway, it seems to be an adequate explanation of the symbolic meaning Godot because the main character would hardly waiting for him so stubbornly and hope that he can save them, if Godot were not God or some deity, especially taking into consideration the fact that neither Estragon nor Victor can definitely say what they are waiting him for and how he actually looks like.
Religious implications of Vladimir and Estragon
At the same time, the main characters also have religious implications. For instance, they recall the execution of Jesus that actually prepares the audience to the perception of the entire play in a religious context. Moreover, they are waiting for Godot as their last chance in their life which can bring them salvation. In such a context, Vladimir and Estragon may be interpreted as symbolical images of religious people or the entire mankind, who are waiting for God to come and save them or, at least they need some divine guidance to their find their path in their life.
In this respect, it is important to underline that both Estragon and Victor are in quire a desperate position because they agree that nothing to be done and they do not have anything to do because it is safer to stay passive and do nothing, but wait for Godot (Beckett, 2006). Nevertheless, even though rationally they deny that they have to do anything, they still undertake efforts to develop their conversation, especially Victor, and probably find their own way in the life.
However, all their efforts are in vain and they keep waiting for Godot till the end of the play, but he will never appear. Remarkably, they are not in despair, but, in contrast, they hope for Godot’ coming that resembles a blind faith of religious people in the appearance of God for the sake of their salvation
Symbolical significance of Pozzo and Lucky
In such a context, Pozzo and Lucky are very symbolic characters. When Estragon and Victor believed Pozzo for Godot, it is possible to interpret this scene as the appearance of a false prophet, who pretends to be God. This impression grows stronger when Pozzo proves to be a guide, if not to say master, of Lucky since he controls Lucky by means of a long rope. In such a way, he leads him and commands him as if he has some superiority and power over him, while Lucky resembles religious fanatics who are ready to follow anyone’s lead, if a person pretends to be a God.
Conclusion
Thus, in conclusion, it is possible to estimate that the religious theme is very strong in the play. The main characters and the image of the mysterious Godot imply the presence of God and people waiting for Him.

References
Beckett, S. (2006).Waiting for Godot. New York: New Publishers.